Blog

One Small Happiness: The Power to Change the Things You Can

a picture of a seasonally decorated part of my house to support celebrating small joys

One Small Happiness: The Power to Change the Things You Can   It’s the end of Spring Break. I’ve spent the day refreshing my home. And reflecting – mostly reflecting that my Spring Break wasn’t as productive as I had planned. Many of you reading know that I have a job role as an Administrator/School Counselor at a small private...[ read more ]

Who, Me? 3 Unlikely Over-Drinkers

a stethoscope to symbolize the text about a nurse who overdrinks but denies he has a problem

I Can’t Have A Problem With Drugs or Alcohol... Even though stereotypes and stigma have been amended significantly, the ideas of who can be a person with a substance use disorder ** still outdated, limited, and provides “cover” to persons who are using defense mechanisms to avoid looking at their relationship with alcohol or drugs. Below are 3 composite vignettes...[ read more ]

Winning the Tug-Of-War Against Substance Abuse Disorder

an image of a tug of war to depict the disease of addiction and how it functions in high functioning alcoholics and high functioning addicts

Motivating Recovery in a High Functioning Person with a Substance Use Disorder As a professional who specializes in treating high functioning persons with a substance use disorder (SUD), I spend a lot of time assessing what motivates people to seek treatment, and what motivates people to stay engaged with habits and activities that support the bio/medical/psych/social/neural changes necessary for contented...[ read more ]

Defense Mechanism Series: Intellectualizing, Rationalizing, Cockiness, Justifying, Explaining, Analyzing

Defense Mechanisms Intellectualizing, Rationalizing, Cockiness, Justifying, Explaining, Analyzing    In my ongoing series of posts featuring the defense mechanisms used by persons with a substance use disorder (SUD), we've covered:   Passive/mild styles: Denying, Lying, Silence, Withdrawing Dismissive techniques: Minimizing, Humor, Compliance Aggressive tools: Manipulating, Accusing, Judging, Projecting and Threatening, Blaming, Shouting, Defiance Today, we'll consider the cerebral set. These...[ read more ]

Threatening, Blaming, Shouting, Defiance (Defense Mechanism Series – Addiction)

a man with his hand in front of his face, covered in smoke to depict defiance regarding quitting substances

Defense Mechanisms Threatening, Blaming, Shouting, Defiance This is the next in my series on Defense Mechanisms used in addiction: drug, alcoholism, or behavioral (also known as process) addiction. Defense mechanisms are the behaviors that persons with a SUD use to protect their use by keeping those close to them away. These methods can be passive, aggressive, cooperative, or hostile. What...[ read more ]

Teens, Parents, and Drinking

a champagne glass with confetti to show you can have fun without alcohol

Parents, Teens, and Drinking It’s not uncommon for parents to adopt the perspective that they can teach responsible drinking by allowing supervised drinking at home, usually at the dinner table. I’ve been deeply concerned about this, but now there is meta-research supporting my concern.  The perceived logic is understandable: We’ll allow our teen to drink at home, under our supervision...[ read more ]

Defense Mechanism Series – Humor, Compliance, and Minimizing

a sign with here, there, everywhere to reinforce the lack of direction involved in compliance for a person in substance abuse recovery

Defense Mechanisms (Denial Series) Humor, Compliance, Minimizing In a series of blog posts, we are highlighting and discussing in detail defense mechanisms of persons with a substance use disorder. To help concerned family members and loved ones understand the forms that "denial" takes, we are looking at the various ways an addicted brain finds to protect the addict’s use of...[ read more ]

6 Point Checklist for When Your Family Member Comes Home from Addiction Treatment

hello on a board with a cup of coffee to reinforce welcoming a family member home from substance abuse treatment

What To Do When Your Family Member Comes Home From Substance Abuse Treatment Welcoming a family member home after substance abuse treatment is an emotionally charged time. Family members are usually excited, encouraged, and hopeful. They are also usually hesitant, guarded, and uncertain. Use my 6-point checklist below to help guide your decisions and interactions in the early days and...[ read more ]

5 Mistakes Family Members Make When Their Loved One Comes Home from Addiction Treatment

together we create written on a wall to symbolize a family working together after substance abuse treatment

When Your Family Member Comes Home From Treatment You’ve been waiting, and perhaps even praying, for this for a long time. Your family member finally agreed to get treatment and has successfully completed inpatient treatment for substance abuse. It’s both a celebratory – and anxiety producing – time. Below find 5 things that families should NOT do when their loved...[ read more ]

3 Key Points When your Children Live with an Addict in Recovery

A road painted with a family in yellow meant to symbolize spending time together, even and especially when someone is in recovery from substance abuse.

It's complicated living with people who have a substance use disorder (SUD). To be honest, it doesn't get less complicated when that person is in recovery. It gets even more challenging with young family members who are able to understand and observe the patterns of behavior that go with a SUD but not old enough to grasp concepts such as “brain...[ read more ]



24618 Kingsland Blvd 2nd Floor, Room 8
Katy, TX 77494
On the left hand side of the CLS building

recoverytherapist@joanneketch.com
(281) 740-7563


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